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October 22, 2007

MEDIA ALERT: Charmaine on Squawk Box on CNBC Debating Online Gambling

October 22, 2007 | By | No Comments

Words are important. Especially in the selling of ideas; selling the intangibles in the marketing of public policy.

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The Squawk Box on CNBC It is a swamp. Not a wetland.

It is a jungle. Not a rain-forest

It is abortion. Not a choice.

It is gambling. Not gaming.

The last euphemism is the subject of Charmaine’s media appearance Tuesday, 23 October.

Tomorrow, Charmaine will be debating the wisdom of legalizing online poker on the CNBC business news program “Squawk Box” with Carl Quintanilla, Joe Kernen and Trish Reagan (filling in for Becky Quick).

Hit time is scheduled for 7:15am ET. It will be live. In the morning…

The second guest will be professional poker player Howard Lederer.

If you are up or can TiVo, please watch and let us know what you think.

Listen close: Lederer will say “gaming.” Yoest will say “gambling.”

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Thank you (foot)notes:

From CNBC,

CNBC airs in 95 million homes in North America, 391 million homes worldwide. An appearance on CNBC reaches one of the most influential and affluent audiences in television. A recent CNBC Viewer Tracking Study found that 70% of top management executives watch CNBC and that the average net worth of our viewers exceeds $2.7 million.

“Squawk Box” is the ultimate “pre-market” morning news and talk program, where the biggest names in business and politics bring their most important stories. “Squawk”‘s unique sense of street smarts and wit, mix business news with an unscripted and fast-paced exchange of banter.

Anchored by CNBC’s Joe Kernen, Becky Quick and Carl Quintanilla, CNBC’s signature morning program features reports from Washington, Silicon Valley, London and Hong Kong.

“Squawk Box” brings Wall Street to Main Street and is a “must see” for everyone from the professional trader to the casual investor.

Your Business Blogger counsels to minimize risk, avoid both unjust enrichment and zero sum negotiations. To ignore this advice is, well, gambling.

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