Image Image Image Image Image Image Image Image Image

Management Training

A Message to Garcia, by Elbert Hubbard: Management Delegation & Staff Initiative

July 29, 2011 | By | No Comments

Originally published in 1899, By Elbert Hubbard, this classic deserves a wide audience even in these more modern times. This is a timeless case study on management delegation and staffer initiative.

A Message to Garcia

By Elbert Hubbard

In all this Cuban business there is one man stands out on the horizon of my memory like Mars at perihelion. When war broke out between Spain & the United States, it was very necessary to communicate quickly with the leader of the Insurgents. Garcia was somewhere in the mountain vastness of Cuba- no one knew where. No mail nor telegraph message could reach him. The President must secure his cooperation, and quickly.

What to do!

Some one said to the President, “There’s a fellow by the name of Rowan will find Garcia for you, if anybody can.”

Rowan was sent for and given a letter to be delivered to Garcia. How “the fellow by the name of Rowan” took the letter, sealed it up in an oil-skin pouch, strapped it over his heart, in four days landed by night off the coast of Cuba from an open boat, disappeared into the jungle, & in three weeks came out on the other side of the Island, having traversed a hostile country on foot, and delivered his letter to Garcia, are things I have no special desire now to tell in detail.

The point I wish to make is this: McKinley gave Rowan a letter to be delivered to Garcia; Rowan took the letter and did not ask, “Where is he at?” By the Eternal! there is a man whose form should be cast in deathless bronze and the statue placed in every college of the land. It is not book-learning young men need, nor instruction about this and that, but a stiffening of the vertebrae which will cause them to be loyal to a trust, to act promptly, concentrate their energies: do the thing- “Carry a message to Garcia!”

General Garcia is dead now, but there are other Garcias.

No man, who has endeavored to carry out an enterprise where many hands were needed, but has been well nigh appalled at times by the imbecility of the average man- the inability or unwillingness to concentrate on a thing and do it. Slip-shod assistance, foolish inattention, dowdy indifference, & half-hearted work seem the rule; and no man succeeds, unless by hook or crook, or threat, he forces or bribes other men to assist him; or mayhap, God in His goodness performs a miracle, & sends him an Angel of Light for an assistant. You, reader, put this matter to a test: You are sitting now in your office- six clerks are within call.

Summon any one and make this request: “Please look in the encyclopedia and make a brief memorandum for me concerning the life of Correggio”.

Will the clerk quietly say, “Yes, sir,” and go do the task?

On your life, he will not. He will look at you out of a fishy eye and ask one or more of the following questions:

Who was he?

Which encyclopedia?

Where is the encyclopedia?

Was I hired for that?

Don’t you mean Bismarck?

What’s the matter with Charlie doing it?

Is he dead?

Is there any hurry?

Shan’t I bring you the book and let you look it up yourself?

What do you want to know for?

And I will lay you ten to one that after you have answered the questions, and explained how to find the information, and why you want it, the clerk will go off and get one of the other clerks to help him try to find Garcia- and then come back and tell you there is no such man. Of course I may lose my bet, but according to the Law of Average, I will not.

Now if you are wise you will not bother to explain to your “assistant” that Correggio is indexed under the C’s, not in the K’s, but you will smile sweetly and say, “Never mind,” and go look it up yourself.

And this incapacity for independent action, this moral stupidity, this infirmity of the will, this unwillingness to cheerfully catch hold and lift, are the things that put pure Socialism so far into the future. If men will not act for themselves, what will they do when the benefit of their effort is for all? A first-mate with knotted club seems necessary; and the dread of getting “the bounce” Saturday night, holds many a worker to his place.

Advertise for a stenographer, and nine out of ten who apply, can neither spell nor punctuate- and do not think it necessary to.

Can such a one write a letter to Garcia?

“You see that bookkeeper,” said the foreman to me in a large factory.

“Yes, what about him?”

“Well he’s a fine accountant, but if I’d send him up town on an errand, he might accomplish the errand all right, and on the other hand, might stop at four saloons on the way, and when he got to Main Street, would forget what he had been sent for.”

Can such a man be entrusted to carry a message to Garcia?

We have recently been hearing much maudlin sympathy expressed for the “downtrodden denizen of the sweat-shop” and the “homeless wanderer searching for honest employment,” & with it all often go many hard words for the men in power.

Nothing is said about the employer who grows old before his time in a vain attempt to get frowsy ne’er-do-wells to do intelligent work; and his long patient striving with “help” that does nothing but loaf when his back is turned. In every store and factory there is a constant weeding-out process going on. The employer is constantly sending away “help” that have shown their incapacity to further the interests of the business, and others are being taken on. No matter how good times are, this sorting continues, only if times are hard and work is scarce, the sorting is done finer- but out and forever out, the incompetent and unworthy go.

It is the survival of the fittest. Self-interest prompts every employer to keep the best- those who can carry a message to Garcia.

I know one man of really brilliant parts who has not the ability to manage a business of his own, and yet who is absolutely worthless to any one else, because he carries with him constantly the insane suspicion that his employer is oppressing, or intending to oppress him. He cannot give orders; and he will not receive them. Should a message be given him to take to Garcia, his answer would probably be, “Take it yourself.”

Tonight this man walks the streets looking for work, the wind whistling through his threadbare coat. No one who knows him dare employ him, for he is a regular fire-brand of discontent. He is impervious to reason, and the only thing that can impress him is the toe of a thick-soled No. 9 boot.

Of course I know that one so morally deformed is no less to be pitied than a physical cripple; but in our pitying, let us drop a tear, too, for the men who are striving to carry on a great enterprise, whose working hours are not limited by the whistle, and whose hair is fast turning white through the struggle to hold in line dowdy indifference, slip-shod imbecility, and the heartless ingratitude, which, but for their enterprise, would be both hungry & homeless.

Have I put the matter too strongly? Possibly I have; but when all the world has gone a-slumming I wish to speak a word of sympathy for the man who succeeds- the man who, against great odds has directed the efforts of others, and having succeeded, finds there’s nothing in it: nothing but bare board and clothes.

I have carried a dinner pail & worked for day’s wages, and I have also been an employer of labor, and I know there is something to be said on both sides. There is no excellence, per se, in poverty; rags are no recommendation; & all employers are not rapacious and high-handed, any more than all poor men are virtuous.

My heart goes out to the man who does his work when the “boss” is away, as well as when he is at home. And the man who, when given a letter for Garcia, quietly take the missive, without asking any idiotic questions, and with no lurking intention of chucking it into the nearest sewer, or of doing aught else but deliver it, never gets “laid off,” nor has to go on a strike for higher wages.

Civilization is one long anxious search for just such individuals. Anything such a man asks shall be granted; his kind is so rare that no employer can afford to let him go. He is wanted in every city, town and village- in every office, shop, store and factory. The world cries out for such: he is needed, and needed badly- the man who can carry a message to Garcia.

THE END-

###

Thank you (foot)notes,

Be sure to follow Your Business Blogger(R) and Charmaine on Twitter: @JackYoest and @CharmaineYoest

Jack also blogs at Reasoned Audacity and at Management Training of DC, LLC.

Organizational Behavior, Syllabus Fall 2011, MGT 311, The Catholic University of America

July 6, 2011 | By | No Comments

under construction

Organizational Behavior, MGT 311, Syllabus Fall 2011, The Catholic University of America

Following and linked are the two books for MGT 311 Organizational Behavior for the Fall 2011.

1) A Primer on Organizational Behavior, 7th Edition

James L. Bowditch (Boston College), Anthony F. Buono (Bentley College)

November 2007, ©2008

http://www.wiley.com/WileyCDA/WileyTitle/productCd-EHEP000080.html

2) Classics of Organizational Behavior Fourth Edition

Walter E. Natemeyer and Paul Hersey

http://www.waveland.com/Titles/Natemeyer-Hersey.htm

MGT 311-01

(3070)

Aug 29, 2011-

Dec 17, 2011

Mo 1:10PM – 3:40PM

McMahon 201

Organizational Behavior (Lecture)

Chapter 1. Management And Organizational Behavior.

Learning About Organizational Behavior.

Ethics and Organizational Behavior.

A Historical Framework for the Study of Management and OB.

Early Management.

Classical Management.

Neoclassical Management and Organization Theory.

Modern Management and Organization Theory.

Societal Change and Organizational Behavior.

OB and Advanced Information and Manufacturing Technologies.

The Quality Movement.

Discontent, Cynicism, and Fear in the Workplace.

Sociodemographic Diversity in the Workplace.

Fads and Foibles in Management.

Conclusion.

Notes.

Chapter 2. Perception, Attitudes, And Individual Differences.

Basic Internal Perceptual Organizing Patterns.

Gestalt Psychology.

External Factors in Perception.

Social and Interpersonal Perception.

Schemas and Scripts.

Perceptual Distortion.

Attribution Theory.

Perception and Individual Differences.

Personality.

Self-Concept.

Perception, Individual Differences, and Decision Making.

Attitudes and Attitude Formation.

Attitude Formation.

Attitude Change.

Emotional Intelligence.

Conclusion: The Social Context of Judgment and Choice.

Notes.

Chapter 3. Motivation.

Managerial Assumptions about Human Nature.

Static-Content Theories of Motivation.

Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs.

Alderfer’s ERG Theory.

McClelland’s Theory of Socially Acquired Needs.

Needs and Goal Orientation.

Herzberg’s Motivator-Hygiene Theory.

Managerial Application: Work Design and Job Enrichment.

Process Theories of Motivation.

Expectancy Theory.

Path-Goal Theory of Motivation.

Goal-Setting Theory.

Managerial Application: Management by Objectives.

Environmentally Based Theories of Motivation.

Operant Conditioning and Reinforcement Theory.

Managerial Application: Organizational Behavior Modification.

Punishment and Discipline.

Social Comparison Theory.

Intrinsic and Extrinsic Rewards and Motivation.

Managerial Application: Gainsharing.

Motivation and the Psychological Contract.

Organizational Commitment and the Psychological Contract.

Choosing an Appropriate Motivational Model.

Contrasting Motivation and Learning.

Conclusion.

Notes.

Chapter 4. Communication.

The Communication Process.

Interpersonal Communication.

Communication Modes.

Barriers to Effective Communication.

Improving Interpersonal Communication.

Organizational Communication.

Knowledge Management.

Communication Networks

Organizational Symbols and Rituals.

In-House Publications.

Communication Roles.

Media Richness and Communication Effectiveness.

Envisioning and Communicating Organizational Change.

Ethics in Organizational Communication.

Conclusion.

Notes.

Chapter 5. Group Dynamics.

Types of Groups.

Primary and Secondary Groups.

Formal and Informal Groups.

Heterogeneous and Homogeneous Groups.

Interacting and Nominal Groups.

Permanent and Temporary Groups.

Basic Attributes of Groups.

Individual and Group Status.

Roles.

Norms.

Cohesiveness.

Group (Organizational) Commitment.

Groupthink.

Choice-Shift (Risky-Shift) Phenomenon.

Social Loafing.

Group Process and Development.

Group Development.

Group and Organizational Socialization.

Observation of Group Process.

Conclusion.

Notes.

Chapter 6. Work Teams And Intergroup Relations: Managing Collaboration And Conflict.

Work Teams.

Managing Teams.

Teams and Social Identity Theory.

Trust Building and Teamwork.

Teams in Action.

Virtual Teams.

Team Conflict.

Intergroup Relations.

Group Interdependence.

Intergroup Conflict.

Conclusion: Implications for Managers.

Notes.

Chapter 7. Leadership, Power, And The Manager.

Leadership and Power.

Power and Authority.

Types of Power.

The Need for Power in Managerial Performance.

Theories of Leadership.

Trait Theory.

Behavioral and Functional Theories.

Contingency Theories.

Attribution Theory.

Leader-Member Relations.

Leadership and Management.

Mintzberg’s Managerial Role Set.

The Role of the General Manager.

Implications for Management and Leadership.

Substitutes for Leadership as Supervision.

Transformational Leadership and Organizational Change.

Gender, Power, and Leadership.

Leadership: A Synthesis.

Notes..

Chapter 8. Macro-Organizational Behavior: The Organization’s Environment.

Organizational Environment.

Defining Organizational Environment.

Environmental Change and Uncertainty.

Organization-Environment Relations.

Controlling the Environment.

The International Environment.

Globalization and Organizational Behavior.

Transferability of Management Practices.

Societal Culture and Management.

Conclusion.

Notes.

Chapter 9. Organization Structure And Design.

Organizational Structure.

Complexity.

Formalization.

Centralization.

Key Organization Structure Challenges.

Determinants of Structure.

Organization Design.

Simple Structure.

The Functional Organization.

The Divisionalized Form.

Adhocracy.

Market-Based, Network Organizational Forms.

Conclusion.

Notes.

Chapter 10. Organizational Culture And Effectiveness.

Organizational Culture.

Uniqueness of Organizational Cultures.

Objective and Subjective Organizational Culture.

Organizational Subcultures.

Summary.

Diagnosing Organizational Culture.

Culture Change in Organizations.

Culture as Sustained Competitive Advantage.

Ethical Considerations and Organizational Culture.

Organizational Climate.

Organizational Effectiveness.

One-Dimensional Views of Effectiveness.

Competing Values and Organizational Effectiveness.

Conclusion.

Notes.

Chapter 11. Organization Development And Change.

Organization Development.

Laboratory Training.

Survey Research and Feedback.

Sociotechnical Systems.

The Nature of Organization Development.

Intervention Strategies and Change.

Managing Organizational Change.

Changemakers.

Approaches to Organizational Change.

Enabling Large-Scale Organizational Change.

Interventions and Organizational Politics.

Resistance, Support, and Coping with Change.

Organizational Downsizing, Retrenchment, and Resizing.

Conclusion.

http://www.wiley.com/WileyCDA/WileyTitle/productCd-EHEP000080.html

Section I: ORIGINS OF ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR

1. The Principles of Scientific Management (Frederick Winslow Taylor)

2. The Giving of Orders (Mark Parker Follett)

3. The Hawthorne Experiments (Fritz J. Roethlisberger)

4. Overcoming Resistance to Change (Lester Coch and John R. P. French, Jr.)

5. The Human Side of Enterprise (Douglas M. McGregor)

Section II: MOTIVATION AND PERFORMANCE

1. A Theory of Human Motivation (Abraham H. Maslow)

2. Achievement Motivation (David C. McClelland)

3. One More Time: How Do You Motivate Employees? (Frederick Herzberg)

4. Existence, Relatedness, and Growth Model (Clayton P. Alderfer)

5. Expectancy Theory (John P. Campbell, Marvin D. Dunnette, Edward E. Lawler, III, and Karl E. Weick Jr.)

6. On the Folly of Rewarding A, While Hoping for B (Steven Kerr)

7. Goal Setting–A Motivational Technique That Works (Gary P. Latham and Edwin A. Locke)

Section III: INTERPERSONAL AND GROUP BEHAVIOR

1. Cosmopolitans and Locals (Alvin W. Gouldner)

2. Assets and Liabilities in Group Decision Making (Norman R. F. Maier)

3. Origins of Group Dynamics (Dorwin Cartwright and Alvin Zander)

4. Group and Intergroup Relationships (Edgar H. Schein)

5. Groupthink (Irving L. Janis)

6. Transactional Analysis (Muriel James and Dorothy Jongeward)

7. The Johari Window (Jay Hall)

8. The Abilene Paradox: The Management of Agreement (Jerry B. Harvey)

9. Stages of Group Development (Bruce W. Tuckman and Mary Ann C. Jensen)

10. Self-Directed Work Teams (Ralph Stayer)

Section IV: LEADERSHIP

1. The Managerial Grid (Robert Blake and Jane Mouton)

2. How to Choose a Leadership Pattern (Robert Tannenbaum and Warren H. Schmidt)

3. Leadership Decision Making (Victor H. Vroom and Arthur G. Jago)

4. One Minute Management (Kenneth H. Blanchard)

5. Fundamental Leadership Practices (James M. Kouzes and Barry Z. Posner)

6. Management and Leadership (John P. Kotter)

7. Servant Leadership (Robert K. Greenleaf)

8. Situational Leadership (Paul Hersey)

9. Crucibles of Leadership (Warren G. Bennis and Robert J. Thomas)

Section V: POWER AND INFLUENCE

1. Is It Better to Be Loved of Feared? (Niccolo Machiavelli)

2. The Bases of Social Power (John R. P. French, Jr. and Bertram Raven)

3. Position Power and Personal Power (Amitai Etzioni)

4. Who Gets Power–and How They Hold on to It (Gerald R. Salancik and Jeffrey Pfeffer)

5. The Power of Leadership (James MacGregor Burns)

6. Situational Leadership and Power (Paul Hersey and Walter E. Natemeyer)

Section V: ORGANIZATIONS, WORK PROCESSES, AND PEOPLE

1. Bureaucracy (Max Weber)

2. The Individual and the Organization (Chris Argyris)

3. Mechanistic and Organic Systems (Tom Burns and G. M. Stalker)

4. Management Systems 1-4 (Rensis Likert)

5. Management by Objectives (George S. Odiorne)

6. Differentiation and Integration (Paul R. Lawrence and Jay W. Lorsch)

7. What’s Missing in MBO? (Paul Hersey and Kenneth H. Blanchard)

8. Reengineering Work Processes (Michael Hammer and James Champy)

Section VII: INCREASING LEADERSHIP AND ORGANIZATIONAL EFFECTIVENESS

1. Skills of an Effective Administrator (Robert L. Katz)

2. Leadership Effectiveness Can Be Learned (Peter F. Drucker)

3. Organization Development (Wendell French)

4. In Search of Excellence (Thomas J. Peters and Robert H. Waterman)

5. The Learning Organization (Peter M. Senge)

6. Competing for the Future (Gary Hamel and C. K. Prahalad)

7. Emotional Intelligence (Daniel Goleman)

8. The Level 5 Leader (Jim Collins)

9. Feedforward (Marshall Goldsmith)

Organizational Behavior,Syllabus Fall 2011, MGT 311,The Catholic University of America

July 6, 2011 | By | No Comments

THE CATHOLIC UNIVERSITY OF AMERICA

DEPARTMENT OF BUSINESS AND ECONOMICS

Organizational Behavior (Lecture), MGT 311, Syllabus, Fall Semester 2011

Credit Hours 3

Enrollment Requirements: MGT323 or 423; Junior status or above

Time and Location of class meetings:

MGT 311-01 (3070)

Aug 29 to Dec 17, 2011

Mondays 1:10 to 3:40PM

McMahon 201

Instructor contact information:

Professor John Wesley Yoest, Jr.

Cell phone 202.215.2434

Yoest@CUA.edu

JackYoest@gmail.com

Offices Hours Tuesdays at 3:30 p.m. or by appointment.

Course Description

Organizational Behavior (OB) is the study of individuals and groups in organizations and is also concerned with the behavior of organizations as whole systems.

This class considers each of these dimensions and their interrelations relevant to the functioning, performance, viability and vitality of human enterprises.

Specific topics addressed include the history of management and organization concepts; perception, attitudes and individual differences; motivation; communication; group dynamics; work teams and intergroup relations including managing collaboration and conflict; leadership, power and decision making; the organizational environment; organization structure and design; organizational culture and effectiveness; organization development and change; and OB research methods.

Instructional Methods, Lecture and Discussion

Required Texts (Two)

1. Primer on Organizational Behavior, Author: Bowditch, Publisher: John Wiley & Sons, Incorporate, Edition: 7th, Year Published: 2008, Price: 102.25 USD, ISBN 9780470086957

2. Classics of Organizational Behavior, Author: Natemeyer, Publisher: Waveland Press, Incorporated, Edition: 4th, Year Published: 2011, Price: 49.95 USD, ISBN 9781577667032

Course Goals

Overview of human behavior in work organizations. Theoretical, empirical and applications issues examined from individual, interpersonal, group and organizational perspectives. Including an overview and history of the field, perceptions, attitudes, learning processes, personality, motivation, stress, performance appraisal, group dynamics, leadership, communication, decision making, job design, organizational structure and design, organizational change and development.

Goals for Student Learning

This Primer on Organizational Behavior, places attention on information technology in the workplace and how it’s reshaping organizations and the management practices within them. The class will cover early management thought, workplace incivility, social justice, conformity in groups, virtual teams, team conflict, leader-member relations, and organizational change.

The Alert Student should learn all the terms and concepts needed to understand OB and its application in modern organizations, and to comprehend practitioner and scholarly publications.

Course Requirements

Quizzes at Random; short answer

Examinations; Multiple choice, short answer

Case Studies; turned in, oral presentation

Class Participation; reviewed below

Expectations and policies

Academic honesty: Academic honesty is expected of all CUA students. Faculty are required to initiate the imposition of sanctions when they find violations of academic honesty, such as plagiarism, improper use of a student’s own work, cheating, and fabrication.

The following sanctions are presented in the University procedures related to Student Academic Dishonesty.

The presumed sanction for undergraduate students for academic dishonesty will be failure for the course. There may be circumstances, however, where, perhaps because of an undergraduate student’s past record, a more serious sanction, such as suspension or expulsion, would be appropriate. In the context of graduate studies, the expectations for academic honesty are greater, and therefore the presumed sanction for dishonesty is likely to be more severe, e.g., expulsion. In the more unusual case, mitigating circumstances may exist that would warrant a lesser sanction than the presumed sanction.

(From http://policies.cua.edu/academicundergrad/integrityprocedures.cfm).

Please review the complete texts of the University policy and procedures regarding Student Academic Dishonesty, including requirements for appeals, at http://policies.cua.edu/academicundergrad/integrity.cfm.

Cell Phone

Don’t. Cell phone or PDA usage including texting and e-mailing is not allowed in class. Do not open a laptop in class. If you anticipate an emergency call, please inform Your Business Professor at the beginning of class and excuse yourself from the classroom to take the call.

Attendance

Punctuality is the courtesy of kings. All students are expected to attend every class on time. Attendance will be recorded for each class. The best tactic to earn class participation points is to show up. If for some reason you will not be in class, please notify Your Business Professor 24 hours ahead of time.

Campus Resources for student support:

Library: Information 5070

Hours 5077

Writing Center 111 OB 4286

Counseling Center 127 OB 5765

Accommodations for students with disabilities: Any student who feels s/he may need an accommodation based on the impact of a disability should contact the instructor privately to discuss specific needs. Please contact Disability Support Services (at 202 319-5211, room 207 Pryzbyla Center) to coordinate reasonable accommodations for students with documented disabilities. To read about the services and policies, please visit the website: http://disabilitysupport.cua.edu.

Assessment

Your final grade will be calculated as follows:

Grade Point Allocation:

3 Tests and the Final Exam: 10 points each; 40 points total

Two Case Studies: 25 points each

Class Participation/Pop quizzes 10 points total

Total = 100 points/percent

Course Grading System:

Test #1 10%

Test #2 10%

Test #3 10%

Final Exam 10%

1st Case 25%

2nd Case 25%

Class Participation 10%

Case Study: Two case studies will be solved in writing (Typed, 12 pt type, double-spaced with a cover sheet) 800 words in length and returned to the instructor on — or before — the date due. The Alert Student will be prepared to deliver a five-minute oral presentation to the class.

See How to Write a Business Case Study. http://www.yoest.com/2009/10/23/how-to-write-a-business-case-study/

Case Study points grading scale:

5 Topic

7 Content

5 Supporting statements

3 Grammar

3 Appearance/delivery

2 Follow directions

==

25 total

Additional information and public speaking helps. http://www.yoest.com/2008/07/31/current-event-presentation-helps/

The Final Exam is comprehensive and will cover material from the entire semester. The Final will be a take-home, open-book and notes exam. All Exams are the individual work and intellectual property of the student with no contact with other individuals permitted.

The Alert Student will expect a quiz in every class.

There is no make up for quizzes or exams-unless approved by the Instructor.

If an assignment is accepted late, a letter-grade grade penalty or at least a 10 percent reduction will be imposed

Class Participation is a subjective measure at the discretion of the Instructor. This is like a job interview: No show; no offer.

Class attendance is mandatory for a number of reasons:

1) Examinations will contain course lecture material that is not in the assigned reading;

2) Your Business Professor asks a lot of questions. It is convenient to attend so that the student might answer;

3) A variety of in-class activities are not available for make-up;

4) The Class Participation portion of the course grade is based upon the significance and quality of the student’s contribution to the discussion and activities

If the Student fears any difficulty with participating in class please see Your Business Professor.

Reports of grades in courses are available at the end of each term on http://cardinalstation.cua.edu.

When Your Business Professor says “Tomorrow” he means the next class meeting – not the next day.

It is normal and customary to wait for any late Professor for 20 minutes.

Draft Your Own Reference Letter. http://www.yoest.com/2011/04/22/how-to-write-a-letter-of-recommendation-or-an-endorsement-from-a-third-party/

See Job Search Tips. http://www.yoest.com/2009/03/30/looking-for-a-job-pass-this-test/

There will only be 14 class sessions.

COURSE OUTLINE

1. August 29

Introduction and Expectations

Chapter 1. Management And Organizational Behavior.

September 5 No Class

2. September 12

Chapter 2. Perception, Attitudes, And Individual Differences.

Chapter 3. Motivation.

Chapter 4. Communication.

3. September 19

Chapter 5. Group Dynamics.

Chapter 6. Work Teams And Intergroup Relations: Managing Collaboration And Conflict.

Chapter 7. Leadership, Power, And The Manager.

4. September 26

Test #1

5. October 3

First Case Study

October 10 No Class

6. October 17

Chapter 8. Macro-Organizational Behavior: The Organization’s Environment.

Chapter 9. Organization Structure And Design.

Chapter 10. Organizational Culture And Effectiveness.

Chapter 11. Organization Development And Change.

7. October 24

Test #2

8. October 31

Section I: ORIGINS OF ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR

1. The Principles of Scientific Management (Frederick Winslow Taylor)

2. The Giving of Orders (Mark Parker Follett)

3. The Hawthorne Experiments (Fritz J. Roethlisberger)

4. Overcoming Resistance to Change (Lester Coch and John R. P. French, Jr.)

5. The Human Side of Enterprise (Douglas M. McGregor)

Section II: MOTIVATION AND PERFORMANCE

1. A Theory of Human Motivation (Abraham H. Maslow)

2. Achievement Motivation (David C. McClelland)

3. One More Time: How Do You Motivate Employees? (Frederick Herzberg)

4. Existence, Relatedness, and Growth Model (Clayton P. Alderfer)

5. Expectancy Theory (John P. Campbell, Marvin D. Dunnette, Edward E. Lawler, III, and Karl E. Weick Jr.)

6. On the Folly of Rewarding A, While Hoping for B (Steven Kerr)

7. Goal Setting–A Motivational Technique That Works (Gary P. Latham and Edwin A. Locke)

9. November 7

Section III: INTERPERSONAL AND GROUP BEHAVIOR

1. Cosmopolitans and Locals (Alvin W. Gouldner)

2. Assets and Liabilities in Group Decision Making (Norman R. F. Maier)

3. Origins of Group Dynamics (Dorwin Cartwright and Alvin Zander)

4. Group and Intergroup Relationships (Edgar H. Schein)

5. Groupthink (Irving L. Janis)

6. Transactional Analysis (Muriel James and Dorothy Jongeward)

7. The Johari Window (Jay Hall)

8. The Abilene Paradox: The Management of Agreement (Jerry B. Harvey)

9. Stages of Group Development (Bruce W. Tuckman and Mary Ann C. Jensen)

10. Self-Directed Work Teams (Ralph Stayer)

10. November 14

Test #3

11. November 21

Section IV: LEADERSHIP

1. The Managerial Grid (Robert Blake and Jane Mouton)

2. How to Choose a Leadership Pattern (Robert Tannenbaum and Warren H. Schmidt)

3. Leadership Decision Making (Victor H. Vroom and Arthur G. Jago)

4. One Minute Management (Kenneth H. Blanchard)

5. Fundamental Leadership Practices (James M. Kouzes and Barry Z. Posner)

6. Management and Leadership (John P. Kotter)

7. Servant Leadership (Robert K. Greenleaf)

8. Situational Leadership (Paul Hersey)

9. Crucibles of Leadership (Warren G. Bennis and Robert J. Thomas)

Section V: POWER AND INFLUENCE

1. Is It Better to Be Loved of Feared? (Niccolo Machiavelli)

2. The Bases of Social Power (John R. P. French, Jr. and Bertram Raven)

3. Position Power and Personal Power (Amitai Etzioni)

4. Who Gets Power–and How They Hold on to It (Gerald R. Salancik and Jeffrey Pfeffer)

5. The Power of Leadership (James MacGregor Burns)

6. Situational Leadership and Power (Paul Hersey and Walter E. Natemeyer)

Section VI: ORGANIZATIONS, WORK PROCESSES, AND PEOPLE

1. Bureaucracy (Max Weber)

2. The Individual and the Organization (Chris Argyris)

3. Mechanistic and Organic Systems (Tom Burns and G. M. Stalker)

4. Management Systems 1-4 (Rensis Likert)

5. Management by Objectives (George S. Odiorne)

6. Differentiation and Integration (Paul R. Lawrence and Jay W. Lorsch)

7. What’s Missing in MBO? (Paul Hersey and Kenneth H. Blanchard)

8. Reengineering Work Processes (Michael Hammer and James Champy)

12) November 28

Section VII: INCREASING LEADERSHIP AND ORGANIZATIONAL EFFECTIVENESS

1. Skills of an Effective Administrator (Robert L. Katz)

2. Leadership Effectiveness Can Be Learned (Peter F. Drucker)

3. Organization Development (Wendell French)

4. In Search of Excellence (Thomas J. Peters and Robert H. Waterman)

5. The Learning Organization (Peter M. Senge)

6. Competing for the Future (Gary Hamel and C. K. Prahalad)

7. Emotional Intelligence (Daniel Goleman)

8. The Level 5 Leader (Jim Collins)

9. Feedforward (Marshall Goldsmith)

13. December 5

2nd Case Study

14. December 12, 2011 In-class exam and take home

Final Exam ______________________________________

If the student would like his/her graded final exam returned, please submit a stamped-self-addressed-envelope to Your Business Professor before the examination on December 5, 2011.

NOTE: This syllabus is subject to change by the instructor without

notification. It may be changed at anytime for any reason without notice by Your Business Professor. The class schedule, course content or tests may be amended or guest speakers may be added without any prior notification.

***
Jack Yoest

John Wesley (Jack) Yoest Jr., is a senior business mentor in high-technology,medicine, non-profit and new media consulting. His expertise is in management training and development, operations, sales, and marketing. He has worked with clients in across the USA, India and East Asia.

Mr. Yoest is an adjunct professor of management in the Science, Technology and Business Division of the Northern Virginia Community College. Mr. Yoest also teaches graduate business students at The Catholic University of America. He is also the president of Management Training of DC, LLC.

He has been published by Scripps-Howard, National Review Online, The Business Monthly, The Women’s Quarterly and other outlets. He was a columnist for Small Business Trends, and was a finalist in the annual 2006 Weblog Awards in the Best Business Blog category for Reasoned Audacity at charmaineyoest.com which covers the intersection of business, culture and politics. The blog has grown to receive over a million unique visitors in five years.

Mr. Yoest served as a gubernatorial appointee in the Administration of Governor James Gilmore in the Commonwealth of Virginia. During his tenure in state government, he acted as the Chief Technology Officer for the Secretary of Health and Human Resources where he was responsible for the successful Year 2000 (Y2K) conversion for the 16,000-employee unit. He also served as the Assistant Secretary for Health and Human Resources, acting as the Chief Operating Officer of the $5 billion budget.

Prior to this post, Mr. Yoest managed entrepreneurial, start-up ventures, which included medical device companies, high technology, software manufacturers, and business consulting companies. His experience includes managing the transfer of patented biotechnology from the National Institutes of Health to his client, which enabled the company to raise $25 million in venture capital funding.

He served as Vice President of Certified Marketing Services International, an ISO 9000 business-consulting firm, where he assisted international companies in human resource certification.

And he also served as President of Computer Applications Development and Integration (CADI), the premier provider of software solutions for the criminal justice market. During his tenure, Mr. Yoest negotiated a strategic partnership with Behring Diagnostics, a $300 million division of Hoechst Celanese, the company’s largest contract.

Mr. Yoest served as a manager with Menlo Care, a medical device manufacturer. While at Menlo, Mr. Yoest was a part of the team that moved sales from zero to over $12 million that resulted in a buy-out by a medical division of Johnson & Johnson.

Mr. Yoest is a former Captain in the United States Army having served in Combat Arms. He earned an MBA from George Mason University and completed graduate work in the International Operations Management Program at Oxford University.

He has been active on a number of Boards and competes in 26.2-mile marathon runs.

Mr. Yoest and his wife, Charmaine Yoest, Ph.D., who is president and CEO Americans United for Life, a public interest law firm, live in the Washington, DC area with their five children.

***

Be sure to grade Your Business Professor at www.RateMyProfessors.com Key word search ‘Yoest.’

Management 323, Test Chapters 1 to 11, The Catholic University of America

March 19, 2011 | By | No Comments

Test for Management 323, The Catholic University of America, 10 points

You do not have to take the test if you are participating in the Business Simulation exercise on 22 March, 2:00 to 6:30 in PRYZ room 342. Class will not meet on 22 March 2011.

Take Home, open book and open notes. No collaboration. Due midnight 23 March 2011.

Chapters 1 to 11.

1. What is more important to the manager, technical skills or people skills and why?

2. Dr. Peter Drucker said that good managers _________________ the strengths of staff and ________________their weaknesses.

3. What is a monkey and whose back does it belong?

4. Management is

5. _______________ + ___________________ = motivation

6. Manager’s formula for success

7. The manager should be: efficient or effective, and why?

8. The individual contributor should be efficient or effective, and why?

9. What did President John Adams say about controlling events?

10. What is the equity theory?

11. What is expectancy theory?

12. How do you know if you are being treated like a child at work, or behaving like a child?

13. What is the best way to learn to be a manager?

14. Describe the four E’s of Jack Welch.

For questions 15 to 18: Competent, Incompetent, Industrious, lazy

15. Which two characteristics make for the best leader and why?

16. Which two characteristics make for the best staffer and why?

17. Which two characteristics make for the most dangerous manager and why?

18. Which two characteristics make for harmless-least dangerous manager and why?

19. What are the four components of management?

20. What is responsibility and can it be delegated?

###

Thank you (foot)notes,

Be sure to follow Your Business Blogger(R) and Charmaine on Twitter: @JackYoest and @CharmaineYoest

Jack and Charmaine also blog at Reasoned Audacity and at Management Training of DC, LLC.

Catholic University of America, Management: Theory and Practice, MGT 323, Exam Review, Chapters 1-7

February 22, 2011 | By | No Comments

The Alert Student will understand the vocabulary of management using the text book and the in-class materials.

The exam might include, but will not be limited to, these topics.

The exam will be timed at 35 minutes.

Knowledge Management

Four components-functions of management

Managers need three broad skills

Of those three skills, what does s/he need most; and need least?

Social Capital

List inputs into an organization and outputs

Management in a sentence

Management in a word

Who determines company success?

The purpose of business is to create a _____________ and make a ______________.

Benchmarking

Critical vs Core

What is Nordstrom’s one rule for employees?

What is the difference between a “life lie” and a “business lie”?

ethics

goals

SWOT

vertical integration

There are two major business strategies to compete in a particular industry

What is a monkey and why is this important?

groupthink

one rule for brainstorming

Entrepreneurs are motivated solely by money, discuss

What is the most important part of a business plan?

Where does the entrepreneur usually get start-up capital?

What is a business incubator?

IPO

Advisory Board

Organization Chart

Authority

Span of Control

Line vs Staff departments and where should you work.

Departmentalization

Matrix vs Unity of command

ISO 9000

JIT

HRM

What is the number one reason employees get fired?

360-degree appraisal

women earn 76% of men. Is this fair?

John Wesley Yoest, Jr. (Jack) Adjunct Professor, Graduate Management Program, The Catholic University of America

December 10, 2010 | By | No Comments

JACK_YOEST_pubshot_2010.JPG

Jack Yoest

Photo Credit: Hannah Yoest

Jack serves as President of Management Training of DC, LLC; His consulting practice draws on his expertise in operations and sales and marketing, and senior management development. Jack Yoest is an Adjunct Professor at The Catholic University of America and an Adjunct Professor of Management in the Business Technologies Division of the Northern Virginia Community College.

In addition to his writing here at Reasoned Audacity and in Management Training of DC, Jack is a freelance writer for the Business & Media Institute. He has also contributed to Small Business Trends, Small Business Trends Radio, and The Business Monthly.

Jack has managed entrepreneurial start-up ventures, including medical device companies, high technology, software manufacturers, and business consulting companies. His assignments have included:

* Served as Chief Operating Officer of Job Accord, a multi-national human resource company with offices in New York, Washington, D.C., London, New Delhi and Bangalore;

* Partner in Global Strategies, Incorporated, advisors for international business development.

* Managed the transfer of patented biotechnology from the National Institutes of Health to his client, which enabled the company to raise $25 million in venture capital funding.

* Vice President of Certified Marketing Services International, an ISO 9000 business-consulting firm, where he assisted international companies in human resource certification.

* President of Computer Applications Development and Integration (CADI), the premier provider of software solutions for the criminal justice market. CADI dominates the market of case management software, with the largest number of installations in the world. During his tenure, Jack negotiated a strategic partnership with Behring Diagnostics, a $300 million division of Hoechst Celanese, the company’s largest contract.

* Jack also served as a gubernatorial appointee in the Administration of Governor James Gilmore in the Commonwealth of Virginia, serving as the Assistant Secretary for Health and Human Resources, acting as the Chief Operating Officer of the $5 billion budget. During his tenure in state government, Jack acted as the Chief Technology Officer for the Secretariat, where he was responsible for the successful Year 2000 (Y2K) conversion for the 16,000-employee unit.

* Served as a manager with Menlo Care, a medical device manufacturer. While at Menlo, he was a part of the team that moved sales from zero to over $12 million, resulting in a buy-out by a medical division of Johnson & Johnson.

* A former Captain in the United States Army, having served in Combat Arms and on the U.S. Armor and Engineer Board, Jack directed research and conducted testing, and recommended solutions to problems in night vision and electro-optics.

Jack earned an MBA from George Mason University and completed graduate work in the International Operations Management Program at Oxford University. His publications include “Doing Business in the Values Vacuum,” an article syndicated by Scripps-Howard News Service to over 350 newspapers worldwide, and functions as a ghostwriter for high profile managers and blogs, including Presidential candidates.

Jack competes in marathon (26.2 mile) runs, and he and his wife, Charmaine Yoest, Ph.D., live in the Washington, D.C. area with their five children (the Penta-Posse).

###

Thank you (foot)notes,

Be sure to follow Your Business Blogger(R) and Charmaine on Twitter: @JackYoest and @CharmaineYoest

Jack and Charmaine also blog at Reasoned Audacity and at Management Training of DC, LLC.

Short bio at the jump.

Read More

BUS 111 – Principles of Supervision I, Syllabus

July 28, 2010 | By | No Comments

jack_yoest_pub_shot_2007.jpgBusiness 111 Principles of Supervision I, syllabus

Description

BUS 111 – Principles of Supervision I

John Wesley Yoest, Jr. (Jack)

Adjunct Professor of Management Science, Technology and Business

Principles of Supervision 1 (Lecture)

Mondays and Wednesdays

11:30 am to 12:45 pm

August 23 to December 13, 2010

Classroom location to be announced

Main Campus:

Northern Virginia Community College

3001 North Beauregard Street

Alexandria, VA 22311

NVCC phone: 703 845-6200

Fax: 703-845-6009

replacewithjackemail

or,

JYoest@NVCC.edu

Cell: 202.215.2434

Education:

M.B.A., George Mason University

B.S., Old Dominion University

Graduate Course Work, Oxford University

1) Principles of Supervision 1:

Prerequisites: Each student must be able to:

1) Read and write English fluently. A satisfactory placement score for ENG 111 is strongly recommended, and

2) Have the desire to understand the work of the first line supervisor.

Course Objectives:

Teaches the fundamentals of supervision, including the primary responsibilities of the supervisor. Introduces factors relating to the work of supervisor and subordinates. Covers aspects of leadership, job management, work improvement, training and orientation, performance evaluation, and effective employee/ supervisor relationships.

When you do well in this course, you will be able to:

1. Understand the operating roles of the supervisor.

2. Formulate objectives, make action plans, and assign tasks.

3. Understand motivation and effective leadership.

4. Set standards and evaluate performance.

5. Recognize the need for training and organize on-the-job training as appropriate.

6. Understand techniques for communicating, managing conflict, and administering discipline.

This course teaches the principles, skills, and techniques necessary to manage resources at the operational or front-line level. This course is introductory in that it assumes no previous managerial knowledge or experience.

Text: Supervision; Concepts & Skill-Building, 7th edition; Samuel C. Certo; McGraw-Hill Irwin, 2010.

2) Academic Requirements:

Homework: There will be reading assignments from the text for every class.

Find a friend: Exchange contact information with at least three class members to keep current on any missed classes. This is a course requirement for points. Your Business Professor is not the student’s first point of contact for gathering routine information.

Establish a domain & social media name. The student will reserve and claim a URL address, for example: www.yoest.com. This is a course requirement for points toward final grade.

Quizzes: Expect a short quiz in the first ten minutes of every class period. Questions may be very short answer, or fill-in-the-blank.

Class Participation: The Student is expected to volunteer and help move the class discussions.

Supervision in Current Events: To be presented in person and turned in on paper. Details below.

Examinations: There will be a Mid-Term and Final Exam; multiple choice and short answer. The Final Exam will be given on 13 December, the last day of class. The Final will be comprehensive.

3) Attendance:

Regular attendance of this course is expected. Failure to do so could have an adverse effect on the student’s course grade. Any class material and assignments missed are the student’s responsibility. Success will depend upon showing up.

Attendance will be taken at each class. Attendance at scheduled tests and presentations is mandatory. No make-ups will be given — there are no exceptions from Your Business Professor.

If a student misses the first two weeks of class s/he will be dropped from the class.

Canceled Classes: If class is canceled for any reason, the student is still responsible for the material due. Any quiz on that material might be given at the next class, in addition to the regularly scheduled quiz.

Supervision Current Events Presentations will not be accepted late and must be delivered in person.

Special Needs and Accommodations–Please address with the instructor any special problems or needs at the beginning of the semester/session. If the student is seeking accommodations based on disability, then s/he should provide a disability data sheet, which can be obtained from the Counselor for Special Needs.

In the event of an emergency cancellation of class, please check Blackboard for further instructions.

Excessive absences, as defined in the college catalog, could result in the student receiving the grade ‘F’ for the course.

The Successful Student will devote two hours of class preparation for each hour of class room instruction.

The student will be asked to grade the effectiveness of each test.

Withdrawals: Any student can withdraw from this course without academic penalty under certain conditions. Initiation of the withdrawal is the student’s responsibility and the grade of ‘W’ will be awarded.

Last day to drop with tuition refund or change to audit (Census Date) is ______________.

The last day for withdrawal, without academic penalty, for this semester/session is _______________.

Beyond this date dropping a course or failure to attend will result in the grade of ‘F’ except under mitigating circumstances. Documentation of these circumstances is required AND a grade of ‘W’ implies that the student was making satisfactory progress (passing) in the course at the time of the withdrawal.

Campus classes are closed by division, day or evening. Sometimes day classes will meet and evening classes will be canceled or vice versa. The evening division starts with 4:30 p.m. classes.

4) Testing and Grading:

Normally this instructor will assign only the grades of A, B, C, D, or F. Special grades such as W, I, and R will be assigned only in those circumstances prescribed in the college catalog.

The grade of X (audit) must be initiated by the student and will be assigned only when the student has attended class regularly. Failure to do so will result in the instructor issuing the grade of ‘F’.

Course Grading System:

A = 90-100

B = 80-89

C = 70-79

D = 60-69

F = 0-59

Grade Point Allocation:

Exams: Two each, 15 points each; 30 points total

Quizzes: Fifteen (15) @ 2 points each; 30 points total

Supervision Current Events Presentation: 20 points

Class Participation 10

Text Book: 1 points

Exchange contact info: 1

Claim Domain Name: 1

Claim Facebook/Twitter Name: 1

Extra Credit as assigned: 6

Total = 100 points/percent

Class Participation: This will be a subjective measure at the discretion of the instructor. Even with the grade structure following, making your voice heard and preparedness are important – they could make the difference in a borderline grade. The only way to begin to earn Class Participation points is to show up.

Supervision Current Event:

Each student will be required to give a brief five minute oral presentation on a supervision related current-event newspaper article. This current-event/internet assignment will be turned in with student notes.

This presentation should be organized:

1) Provide the source of the article.

2) Deliver a brief overview of the topic, and, most important,

3) Your opinion/reaction to the article.

At the beginning of the presentation you will turn in a print-out of the article, being sure to include the newspaper source, date, and website.

Supervision Current Event grading scale:

2 — Choice of article

4 — Follow Directions

4 — Organization

4 — Overview/Reaction/Opinion

4 — Presentation

2 — Turn In

=

20 Total Points

Cheating. The following will be considered cheating in this course:

1. The giving or receiving of aid on any graded assignments or test without specific permission of this instructor.

2. The use of any material on a graded assignment or test other than those authorized by this instructor.

3. Talking or discussion of any kind during a graded test without specific permission of this instructor.

5) Notes and suggestions and hints:

Check the course catalog first for questions.

Be sure to log onto Blackboard to follow assignments and current grade.

Expect to be asked to contribute to each class session.

Do not text-message during class.

When Your Business Professor says “Tomorrow” he means the next class meeting – not the next day.

It is normal and customary to wait for any late Professor for 20 minutes.

Draft Your Own Reference Letter.

Additional information and public speaking helps.

Job Search Tips

Refer your friends to take this business class.

Attention to Detail: No points or credit will be awarded for any project that does not have the student’s name on the work.

BUS 111 Semester Outline; There will be thirty (30) class sessions over sixteen (16) weeks.

COURSE OUTLINE

August 23

Introduction and Expectations

August 25

Ch. 1 What is a Supervisor?

August 30

Ch. 2 Ensuring High Quality

Sept 1

Ch. 3 Groups

September 6

No Class Labor Day

September 8

Ch. 4 Ethics

Ch. 5 Managing Diversity

September 13

Ch. 6 Goals

September 15

Ch. 7 Organizing

September 20

Ch. 8 Leadership

September 22

Ch. 9 Problem Solving

September 27

Exam Review

September 29

Mid-Term Exam____________________________________

October 4

Ch. 10 Communication

October 6

Ch. 10 Con’t

October 11

No Class

October 13

Ch. 11 Motivating

October 18

Ch. 11 Con’t

October 20

Ch. 12 Problem Employees

October 25

Ch. 12 Con’t

October 27

Supervision Current Event DUE; Presentation

November 1

Presentations Con’t

November 3

Ch. 13 Managing Time

November 8

Ch. 13 Con’t

November 10

Ch. 14 Leadership

November 15

Ch. 14 Con’t

November 17

Ch. 15 Selecting Employees

November 22

Ch. 15 Con’t

November 24

No Class

November 29

Management Training class suggested reading:

Do You Have An Incompetent Manager? From The Washington Post

December 1

Ch. 16 Appraising Performance

December 6

Ch. 16 Con’t

December 8

Exam review

December 13

Final Exam ______________________________________

If the student would like his/her graded final exam returned, please submit a stamped-self-addressed-envelope to Your Business Professor before the examination on December 13.

***

Jack Yoest

John Wesley (Jack) Yoest Jr., is a senior business mentor in high-technology, medicine, non-profit and new media consulting. His expertise is in management training and development, operations, sales, and marketing. He has worked with clients in across the USA, India and East Asia.

Mr. Yoest is an adjunct professor of management in the Science, Technology and Business Division of the Northern Virginia Community College. He is also the president of Management Training of DC, LLC.

He has been published by Scripps-Howard, National Review Online, The Business Monthly, The Women’s Quarterly and other outlets. He was a columnist for Small Business Trends, and was a finalist in the annual 2006 Weblog Awards in the Best Business Blog category for Reasoned Audacity which covers the intersection of business, culture and politics. The blog has grown to receive over a million unique visitors in five years.

Mr. Yoest served as a gubernatorial appointee in the Commonwealth of Virginia. During his tenure in state government, he acted as the Chief Technology Officer for the Secretary of Health and Human Resources where he was responsible for the successful Year 2000 (Y2K) conversion for the 16,000-employee unit. He also served as the Assistant Secretary for Health and Human Resources, acting as the Chief Operating Officer of the $5 billion budget.

Prior to this post, Mr. Yoest managed entrepreneurial, start-up ventures, which included medical device companies, high technology, software manufacturers, and business consulting companies. His experience includes managing the transfer of patented biotechnology from the National Institutes of Health to his client, which enabled the company to raise $25 million in venture capital funding.

He served as Vice President of Certified Marketing Services International, an ISO 9000 business-consulting firm, where he assisted international companies in human resource certification.

And he also served as President of Computer Applications Development and Integration (CADI), the premier provider of software solutions for the criminal justice market. During his tenure, Mr. Yoest negotiated a strategic partnership with Behring Diagnostics, a $300 million division of Hoechst Celanese, the company’s largest contract.

Mr. Yoest served as a manager with Menlo Care, a medical device manufacturer. While at Menlo, Mr. Yoest was a part of the team that moved sales from zero to over $12 million that resulted in a buy-out by a medical division of Johnson & Johnson.

Mr. Yoest is a former Captain in the United States Army having served in Combat Arms. He earned an MBA from George Mason University and completed graduate work in the International Operations Management Program at Oxford University.

He has been active on a number of Boards and competes in 26.2-mile marathon runs.

Mr. Yoest and his wife, Charmaine Yoest, Ph.D., who is president and CEO of a public interest law firm, live in the Washington, DC area with their five children.

***

Be sure to grade Your Business Professor at www.RateMyProfessors.com Key word search ‘Yoest.’

Consider these other exciting Business Division courses:

ACC 211 Accounting

BUS 165 Small Business Management

AST 107 Editing and Proofreading

BUS 200 Principles of Management

AST 236 Software Applications or IST 117

BUS 241-1 Business Law I and II

BUS 280 International Business

BUS 100 Introduction to Business

FIN 215 Financial Management

BUS 125 Applied Business Math

ITE 115 Intro to Computer Applications and Concepts

Last day to drop with tuition refund or change to audit (Census Date): September 9, 2010.

Last day to withdraw without grade penalty: November 1, 2010.

Also linked on Management Training of DC, LLC.

See Real Management Training.

###

Be sure to follow Your Business Blogger(R) and Charmaine on Twitter: @JackYoest and @CharmaineYoest

Jack and Charmaine also blog at Reasoned Audacity and at Management Training of DC, LLC.

Thank you (foot)notes,

This introductory management course is offered through the Northern Virginia Community College

The Wonder Crew, by Susan Saint Sing; Selected Quotes

June 15, 2010 | By | No Comments

wonder_crew.jpgThe Wonder Crew, The Untold Story of a Coach, Navy Rowing, and Olympic Immortality, written by Susan Saint Sing published in 2008 is the story of Coach Richard Glendon at the Naval Academy winning the Olympic Gold Medal in 1920 in crew.

The tale is set, “In a time when when admirals thanked rowing coaches for helping to win world wars.” p. 6.

Sing quotes Admiral Cyde Whitlock King, 1920 Navy stroke man,

Of all sports, I think rowing is the greatest…because it is a man’s game in every sense of the word.” p. 21

Rowing is the oldest intercollegiate sport in the USA as well as the oldest international collegiate sport in the world. It uses an eight-oared shell that is some 58′ long, weights 200 pounds, with a top speed of 18 knots. To power the small boat, Coach Glendon, “Was in pursuit of the ancient, elusive arete, the ancient Greek pinnacle of perfection, strength in grace of physical, mental and spiritual balance.” p. 22.

Glendon was building team, not nine individuals,

It wasn’t just a matter of who among them was the best. The individuals were less important than the whole – the [Naval Academy] brigade was the focus, not any one standout. No war was ever won with only one man. Though a brigade would follow the leader of one, that one needed a brigade to follow him. So, too, in rowing. The fundamental question was always “How did the crew look? And the crew was not just each man in seat; it was eight men rowing as one. The boat and the crew at large were a unit, the gestalt was the final equation, not the individual parts. In rowing truly the whole is greater than the sum of the parts.

Author Sing further explains rowing and Coach Glendon’s philosophy,

A good man on a rowing machine, in training on land or in a weight room, might not help a boat go fast. p. 26

The rowers respected Coach Glendon, “He was the orderer of their chaos.” p. 26.

Appearances matter. Sing quotes Glendon, “You can tell a good oarsman sometimes just by the way he sits up straight in the shell.” p. 82.

A crew will pull some 200 strokes over a 2,000 meter course. “The shell capable of accelerating to 18 knots generates the most horsepower of any human-powered watercraft.” p. 88.

Sing quotes Brad Brinegar, from Dartmouth, p. 115,

The oarsman is not a man alone. If his crew is to suceed he must become perfectly synchronized with the other men in the boat. Sometimes, for thirty or forty strokes–more if the crew is really good and well matched–all men in the boat will move together. Every move the stroke makes will be mirrored by the men behind him. all the catches will hit hard and clean…when that happens the boat begins the lift up off the water, air bubbles running under the bow, and there is an exhileration like nothing else I have ever experienced…literally like flying.

The personalities of each seat position are reviewed,

Bow should be neat and easy with his movements, above all a good waterman.

Two [seat] is ditto, but slightly heavier and stronger.

Three, four, and five the most powerful available.

Six seat should be a cleaver oarsman as well as being powerful, and of course…reliable.

Seven should be the most finished oar in the boat.

Stroke (eight) is the most difficult man to find, as he must combine so many qualities, but first and foremost he must be a man of the right personality, a real leader who will not be discouraged by adversity. His weight is immaterial. p. 162.

“A clean boat is a fast boat!” p. 187.

The 1920 USA Men’s Olympic crew was a barrier breaking performance, “Akin to what philosopher Michael Novak describes as the power of athletic achievement in revealing moments of perfect form.” p. 218.

“Rowing is not a game, it is much more akin to riding, skating, or dancing, or any other form of locomotion developed into an art.” Gilbert C. Bourne, A Textbook on Oarsmanship, p. 71

***

Chester Nimitz was the Fleet Admiral of the American Navy in the Pacific in WWII. He commanded over two million men, 5,000 ships and 20,000 aircraft. p. 23. Nimitz had said, “Dick Glendon, by what he put into successive generations of Navy midshipmen, undoubtedly helped us win the naval battles of World War I and World War II.” p. 242

Susan Saint Sing includes among the photographs a picture that hung in Coach Richard Glendon’s house. It shows Admiral Chester Nimitz signing the Japanese surrender documents on the deck of the USS Missouri ending WWII. It is inscribed, “To Dick Glendon with best wishes and warmest regards.”

The photograph is signed, “Nimitz–Fleet Admiral, stroke 1905.” It is not clear of which Nimitz might be more proud: ‘Admiral’ or ‘stroke.’

Syllabus Principles of Management, Business 200, Northern Virginia Community College

May 10, 2010 | By | No Comments

Syllabus Principles of Management

BUSiness 200 040A

John Wesley Yoest, Jr. (Jack)

Adjunct Professor of Management

Science, Technology and Business, Principles of Management (Lecture)

Main Campus:

Tuesdays and Thursdays 6:00pm – 9:20pm

A-Bisdorf/AA- Room 360

May 18, 2010 to June 24, 2010

Northern Virginia Community College

3001 North Beauregard Street

Alexandria, VA 22311

NVCC phone: 703 845-6200

Fax: 703-845-6009

replacewithjackemail

or,

JYoest@NVCC.edu

Cell: 202.215.2434

Education:

M.B.A., George Mason University

B.S., Old Dominion University

Graduate Course Work, Oxford University

1) Course Objective:

Prerequisites: Each student must be able to

1) Read and write English fluently, and

2) Have the desire to understand the practice of management.

Course Objectives:

To enable students to acquire knowledge concerning the basic principles and functioning of management — including the ability to plan, organize, lead, motivate and control.

The Alert Student will review how to problem solve, reason, and communicate at the course completion.

A satisfactory placement score for ENG 111 is strongly recommended.

Text: MGMT2, 2009-2010 edition; Chuck Williams; South-Western Centage Learning, 2010.

2) Academic Requirements:

ASSIGNMENTS:

Homework: There will be reading assignments from the text for every class.

Find a friend. Exchange contact information with at least one class member to keep current on any missed classes. This is a course requirement for points. Your Business Professor is not the student’s first point of contact.

Establish a domain & social media name. The student will reserve and claim a URL address, for example: www.yoest.com, www.yoest.com, www.twitter.com/JackYoest This is a course requirement for points toward final grade.

Quizzes: Expect a short quiz in the first ten minutes of every class period. Questions may be true/false, very short answer, or fill-in-the-blank.

Class Participation: The Student is expected to volunteer and help move the class discussions.

Examinations: There will be a Mid-Term and Final Exam; multiple choice and short answer. The Final Exam will be given on 24 June, the last day of class. The Final will be comprehensive.

3) Attendance:

Regular attendance of this course is expected. Failure to do so could have an adverse effect on the student’s course grade. Any class material and assignments missed are the student’s responsibility. Success will depend upon showing up.

If a student misses the first two weeks of class s/he will be dropped from the class.

Canceled Classes: If class is canceled for any reason, the student is still responsible for the material due. Any quiz on that material might be given at the next class, in addition to the regularly scheduled quiz.

Last Day for Schedule Adjustments with Tuition Refund is ____________.

Last Day to Withdraw Without Grade Penalty or Change to Audit is _________.

Attendance will be taken at each class.

Attendance at scheduled tests and presentations is mandatory. No make-ups will be given — there are no exceptions from Your Business Professor.

Case Study Presentations will not be accepted late and must be delivered in person.

Special Needs and Accommodations: Please address with the instructor any special problems or needs at the beginning of the semester/session. If the student is seeking accommodations based on disability, then s/he should provide a disability data sheet, which can be obtained from the Counselor for Special Needs.

In the event of an emergency cancellation of class, please check Blackboard for further instructions. See http://tac.nvcc.edu/blackboard/student/ .

It is a requirement that the student exchange names and contact information with at least one classmate.

Excessive absences, as defined in the college catalog, could result in the student receiving the grade ‘F’ for the course.

The Successful Student will devote two hours of class preparation for each hour of class room instruction.

The student will be asked to grade the effectiveness of each test.

Withdrawals: Any student may withdraw from this course without academic penalty within the first 60% of the session. Initiation of the withdrawal is the student’s responsibility and the grade of ‘W’ will be awarded.

Last day to drop with tuition refund (Census Date) is ______________.

The last day for withdrawal, without academic penalty, for this semester/session is _______________.

Beyond this date dropping a course or failure to attend will result in the grade of ‘F’ except under mitigating circumstances. Documentation of these circumstances is required AND a grade of ‘W’ implies that the student was making satisfactory progress (passing) in the course at the time of the withdrawal.

Campus classes are closed by division, day or evening. Sometimes day classes will meet and evening classes will be canceled or vice versa. The evening division starts with 4:30 p.m. classes.

Cheating. The following will be considered cheating in this course:

1. The giving or receiving of aid on any graded assignments or test without specific permission of this instructor.

2. The use of any material on a graded assignment or test other than those authorized by this instructor.

3. Talking or discussion of any kind during a graded test without specific permission of this instructor.

4) Testing and Grading:

Normally this instructor will assign only the grades of A, B, C, D, or F. Special grades such as W, I, and R will be assigned only in those circumstances prescribed in the college catalog. The grade of X (audit) must be initiated by the student and will be assigned only when the student has attended class regularly.

Failure to do so will result in the instructor issuing the grade of ‘F’.

Course Grading System:

A = 90-100

B = 80-89

C = 70-79

D = 60-69

F = 0-59

Grade Point Allocation:

Exams: Two each, 15 points each; 30 points total

Quizzes: ten (5) @ 2 points each; 20 points total

Case Study: 30 points

Class Participation 10

Text Book: 1 points

Exchange contact info: 1

Claim Domain Name: 1

Claim Facebook/Twitter Name: 1

Extra Credit as assigned: 6

Total = 100 points/percent

Class Participation: This will be a subjective measure at the discretion of the instructor. Even with the grade structure following, making your voice heard and preparedness are important — they could make the difference in a borderline grade.

The only way to begin to earn Class Participation points is to show up.

Case Study: One case study will be solved in writing (Typed, 12 pt type, double-spaced with a cover sheet) and returned to the instructor on — or before — the date due. Practice cases will be covered in class and sample questions will be given as a uideline (800 words in length). The student should be prepared to deliver a Two Minute Review of the Case Study. See How to Write a Business Case Study.

TIPS:

Be sure to include a cover sheet.

Use headings of “Problem, Solution, Results.”

Have your study partner review, 1 point, include your partner’s name on the cover sheet.

Avoid cliches.

Spell out proper names before using an acronym: Major League Baseball, MLB.

Don’t bury your lead.

Consider starting with a quote or a question.

Case Study grading scale:

Points Topic

3 content

3 supporting statements

2 grammar

1 appearance/delivery

1 follow directions

==

10 total

5) Notes and suggestions and hints:

Check the course catalog first for questions.

Be sure to log onto Blackboard to follow assignments and current grade.

Expect to be asked to contribute to each class session.

Do not text-message during class.

When Your Business Professor says “Tomorrow” he means the next class meeting — not the next day.

It is normal and customary to wait for any late Professor for 20 minutes.

Draft Your Own Reference Letter.

Additional information and public speaking helps.

JobSearch Tips http://www.yoest.com/2009/03/30/looking-for-a-job-pass-this-test/

Refer your friends to take this business class.

Attention to Detail: No points or credit will be awarded for any project that does not have the student’s name on the work.

BUS 200 Semester Outline; There will be only twelve (12) class sessions over six (6) weeks.

COURSE OUTLINE

May 18

Introduction and Expectations

Ch. 1 Management

May 20

Ch. 2 History

Ch. 3 Organization & Culture

May 25

Ch. 4 Ethics & Social Responsibility

Ch. 5 Planning & Decision Making

May 27

Ch. 6 Organization Strategy

Ch. 7 Innovation & Change

June 1

Ch. 8 Global Management

Ch. 9 Designing Adaptive Organizations

June 3

Mid-Term _______________________________________________

June 8

Ch. 10 Managing Teams

Ch. 11 Managing Human Resource Systems

Ch. 12 Managing Individuals & a Diverse Work Force

June 10

Ch. 13 Motivation

Ch. 14 Leadership

Ch. 15 Managing Communication

June 15

Case Study DUE; Presentation

June 17

Ch. 16 Control

Ch. 17 Managing Information

Ch. 18 Managing Services & Manufacturing Operations

June 22

Exam review

June 24

Final Exam ______________________________________

If the student would like his/her graded final exam returned, please submit a stamped-self-addressed-envelope to Your Business Professor before the examination on June 24.

***

Jack Yoest

John Wesley (Jack) Yoest Jr., is a senior business mentor in high-technology, medicine, non-profit and new media consulting. His expertise is in management training and development, operations, sales, and marketing.

He has worked with clients in across the USA, India and East Asia. Mr. Yoest is an adjunct professor of management in the Science, Technology and Business Division of the Northern Virginia Community College.

He is also the president of Management Training of DC, LLC.

He has been published by Scripps-Howard, National Review Online, The Business Monthly, The Women’s Quarterly and other outlets. He was a columnist for Small Business Trends, and was a finalist in the annual 2006 Weblog Awards in the Best Business Blog category for Reasoned Audacity at charmaineyoest.com covers the intersection of business, culture and politics. The blog has grown to receive over a million unique visitors in five years.

Mr. Yoest served as a gubernatorial appointee in the Administration of Governor James Gilmore in the Commonwealth of Virginia. During his tenure in state government, he acted as the Chief Technology Officer for the Secretary of Health and Human Resources where he was responsible for the successful Year 2000 (Y2K) conversion for the 16,000-employee unit.

He also served as the Assistant Secretary for Health and Human Resources, acting as the Chief Operating Officer of the $5 billion budget.

Prior to this post, Mr. Yoest managed entrepreneurial, start-up ventures, which included medical device companies, high technology, software manufacturers, and business consulting companies.

His experience includes managing the transfer of patented biotechnology from the National Institutes of Health to his client, which enabled the company to raise $25 million in venture capital funding.

He served as Vice President of Certified Marketing Services International, an ISO 9000 business-consulting firm, where he assisted international companies in human resource certification. And he also served as President of Computer Applications Development and Integration (CADI), the premier provider of software solutions for the criminal justice market. During his tenure, Mr. Yoest negotiated a strategic partnership with Behring Diagnostics, a $300 million division of Hoechst Celanese, the company’s largest contract.

Mr. Yoest served as a manager with Menlo Care, a medical device manufacturer. While at Menlo, Mr. Yoest was a part of the team that moved sales from zero to over $12 million that resulted in a buy-out by a medical division of Johnson & Johnson.

Mr. Yoest is a former Captain in the United States Army having served in Combat Arms. He earned an MBA from George Mason University and completed graduate work in the International Operations Management Program at Oxford University.

He has been active on a number of Boards and competes in 26.2-mile marathon runs.

Mr. Yoest and his wife, Charmaine Yoest, Ph.D., who is president and CEO of a public interest law firm, live in the Washington, DC area with their five children.

***

Be sure to grade Your Business Professor at www.RateMyProfessors.com Key word search ‘Yoest.’

Last day to drop with tuition refund (Census Date): May 24

Last day to withdraw without grade penalty or change to audit June 11

Also linked on Management Training of DC, LLC.

# # #